Detroit Future City Implementation Office Finalizes Leadership Team & Structure with Addition of Exec. Director and Steering Committee

Seven months later, with 36 impactful pilot projects underway, the Detroit Future City Implementation Office has completed the development of its leadership team by hiring an Executive Director, elevating two existing staffers to Director positions, and introducing an Executive Committee and Steering Committee.

Kenneth V. Cockrel, Jr. has been named Executive Director of the Detroit Future City Implementation Office.  The former Detroit City Council President and Mayor will begin his duties on Monday, January 6, 2014.

“Detroit is at a pivotal moment in its history and the Detroit Future City Strategic Framework presents us with an exciting opportunity to rethink, reshape and rebuild our city,” said Cockrel.  “I am honored to be able to continue serving the residents and neighborhoods of Detroit as we work with our partners to improve the quality of life in Detroit by carrying-out the recommendations of the Strategic Framework.”

The addition of Cockrel and elevation of two existing staffers comes as momentum and demand for Detroit Future City’s guidance is growing.

Read the full story at http://detroitworksproject.com/2013/12/19/detroit-future-city-implementation-office-finalizes-leadership-team-structure-with-addition-of-exec-dir-steering-committee.

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Public Hearings This Week Ask: What Rapid Transit is Right for Woodward?

Come to a public meeting to share your thoughts, concerns, and ideas!!

Monday, Dec. 3, 5pm-7pm at the Berkley Community Center
Tuesday, Dec. 4, 11am-1pm at SEMCOG in downtown Detroit
Tuesday, Dec. 4, 4pm-6pm at the Detroit Police Central District Station
Thursday, Dec. 6, 5pm-7pm at the Baldwin Public Library in Birmingham
Tuesday, Dec. 11, 4pm-6pm at the Detroit Palmer Park Police Station
Wednesday, Dec. 12, 6pm-8 pm at the Ferndale Library
Saturday, Dec. 15, 11am-1pm at Bowen Senior Citizens Center in Pontiac

See http://www.woodwardanalysis.com/get_involved_stay_informed/public_meetings.aspx for more information.

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DDOT Call for Applications – Professional Development Planning Positions

Description

The Detroit Department of Transportation is seeking student candidates for Professional Development Program positions within the Strategic Planning and Scheduling Division for Spring/Summer and Fall/Winter of 2011. We are seeking students with backgrounds in Urban Planning, Public Administration and like disciplines to help in data analysis and interpretation, research, performance measures and service monitoring. Students work between 12-16 hours a week (at least 4 consecutive hours per day) during Fall/Winter, and a maximum of 30-40 hours a week during the Spring/Summer. Start and end dates are flexible. Positions may include compensation.

Submission Deadlines:

Spring/Summer positions: March 10th, 2011 (April-August)
Fall and Winter positions: September 15th, 2011 (September-December)

For more details about the program, please request the DDOT Professional Development Program Overview; to apply please see contact information at the bottom of this notice.

Student Eligibility

Students in good standing at an accredited college or university are eligible to apply. Specific interest in public transportation, public service and in government operations is expected. Ideal candidates are currently enrolled graduate students with a minimum 3.0 GPA, or senior-level undergraduates with a 3.5 GPA or higher.

Though the development program gives students a primary contact and close work with DDOT staff, self-motivated students and students demonstrating strong project leadership fit best in our office environment.

Proficiency with Microsoft Office programs, especially Excel is required. Skills in GIS, statistical analysis, travel demand modeling or project funding are a plus. Skills for each position vary. Qualified applicants will be able to fulfill one of the below profiles.

Position Profiles

Woodward Light Rail

To work with Strategic Planning and Scheduling Division Manager

Projects include:

Reviewing, editing and writing reports and documents related to the Woodward Light Rail (LRT) project, assisting with public hearings, working with other divisions of DDOT, consultants, other City Departments, and MDOT, etc.

Skill Profile:

Ability to interpret data using appropriate planning methods and statistical techniques; familiarity with databases and their management; standard transportation planning principles, methods and processes, including land use planning; strong research skills; strong written and oral communication skills; ability to prepare written reports, surveys and recommendations.

Performance Measurement and Service Monitoring

To work with Service Monitoring Planner and Scheduling Manager

Projects Include:

On-time service performance measurement; route structuring; analysis and review of ridership and ride-check/point-check data; analysis and review of Automatic Vehicle Locator and Automatic Passenger Counter data; analysis of scheduling data (Trapeze); data collection survey design.

Skill Profile:

Ability to interpret data using appropriate planning methods and statistical techniques; familiarity with databases and their management; standard transportation planning principles, methods and processes; strong research skills; strong written and oral communication skills; ability to prepare written reports, surveys and recommendations.

General Planning

To work with the Strategic Planning and Scheduling Division Planning Assistant

Projects Include:

Assistance updating strategic plans and policies; assistance with non-motorized projects (complete streets, bicycle and pedestrian planning); revision of service strategies for suburban, high school and university ridership; fare development, restructuring and scenario planning; special events planning; development of social media and communications materials.

Skill Profile:

Ability to interpret data using appropriate planning methods and statistical techniques; familiarity with databases and their management; standard transportation planning principles, methods and processes, including land use planning; strong research skills; strong written and oral communication skills; ability to prepare written reports, surveys and recommendations.

To Apply

Please e-mail a cover letter, resume and unofficial transcripts to the contact provided below, including an e-mail subject line in the following format:

(Season) 2011, (Position Applying For), (Your Name)
e.g.: Spring/Summer 2011, General Planning, Hannah Kelley

A letter of recommendation is not necessary, but two references are requested for persons competent to comment on your qualifications for this position.

Due to volume of applications and limited staff time, applicants not selected for consideration will not be contacted.

Hannah Kelley
Planning Assistant
City of Detroit – Department of Transportation
Strategic Planning Division
1301 E. Warren
Detroit, Michigan 48207
Office: (313) 833-9647
Fax: (313) 833-5493
Email: HanKel@detroitmi.gov

Revised 8/18/2011 HK

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Bottoms Up, Detroit: How Grassroots Programs are Making a Real Difference

Author: Elizabeth Bastian

I ascended the white marble steps of the Detroit Public Library in late May, invited to attend a symposium on “urban centers” in Detroit. I was expecting to find a group of seasoned professionals who shared strong opinions about a city they had only seen from an airplane or through the window of a taxi.

Instead, I encountered artistically minded people that included Kate Draughdrill, a young artist only weeks out of graduate school, and David Dixon, an experienced architect/urban planner from Boston and author of the New Orleans 2030 post-Katrina plan. Each person on the panels, which were moderated by Marja Winters, deputy director for the city of Detroit and co-project director for the Detroit Works Project, contributed to the discussion by sharing their experiences within the city, as well as by comparing and contrasting Detroit to similar cities across the country.

The architects, planners, and social activists offered advice and proposed simple actions that could be taken to improve Detroit’s situation. Dixon, part of the Massachusetts-based firm Goody Clancy, focused his keynote speech as well as his panel points on what he called “the age of the walkscore.” Claiming that downtowns are more important than anything, he asserted that the young college-educated individuals who are moving into urban environments today want diversity and walkability in their living space.

“It is downtown where the innovation happens … places to walk to that bring folks together are the real value,” says Dixon, adding that urban neighborhoods need a strong downtown core to be viable.

Read the full article at http://www.dbusiness.com/DBusiness/May-June-2011/Bottoms-Up-Detroit-How-Grassroots-Programs-are-Making-a-Real-Difference/

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Detroit Revitalization Fellows Program

The Detroit Revitalization Fellows Program is designed to attract, develop and retain promising young professionals who will help lead the economic revitalization and development of Detroit. This talent pool is being cultivated in order to build the capacity of public, for-profit, nonprofit and quasi-public organizations, including Detroit’s anchor institutions. The Detroit Fellows program is an outstanding opportunity for those looking to build a career in the fields of economic and business development, real estate and urban planning. It is also an outstanding opportunity to be a key contributor to the transformation of Detroit… to creating the Detroit of tomorrow.

The Detroit Revitalization Fellows Program is modeled after the successful Rockefeller Foundation Redevelopment Fellowships launched in 2007 in New Orleans.  That program, administered by the Center for Urban Redevelopment Excellence at the University of Pennsylvania, enabled key redevelopment organizations in New Orleans to recruit qualified professionals from across the country to work on the rebuilding process there.

More information at http://wayne.edu/detroitfellows/

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Entrepreneurs feed Detroit’s extreme makeover

Author: Laura Vanderkam

Henry Ford and Margarita Barry don’t have much in common, but they do have this: Both have aspired to create jobs in Detroit.

Ford, of course, built Ford Motor Co., one of three car companies that dominated this city for the past century — their boom making Detroit rich, and their long bust leaving a legacy of vacant lots and an unemployment rate above the national average.

Barry, 26, grew up in their shadow but always saw another side to Detroit: an artistic and rather edgy one. So last year, she launched I Am Young Detroit, a website devoted to Detroit news and events. With new funding on the way, she’ll be adding a handful of full-time and part-time positions this spring. Detroit, she says, is a great place to start a business. Real estate is cheap, and “there are so many people out there with talent, primed and ready to get back to work.”

In addition to its own editorials, USA TODAY publishes a variety of opinions from outside writers. On political and policy matters, we publish opinions from across the political spectrum.

Read the full article at http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/forum/2011-03-09-column09_ST_N.htm

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